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Publication Abstract Display
Type: Published Manuscript
Title: Dynamic indices of methamphetamine dependence and HIV infection predict fluctuations in affective distress: A five-year longitudinal analysis.
Authors: Montoya JL, Umlauf A, Abramson I, Badiee J, Woods SP, Atkinson JH, Grant I, Moore DJ, and the TMARC Group
Year: 2013
Publication: Journal of Affective Disorders
Volume: 151 Issue: 2 Pages: 728-737
Abstract:Background: Methamphetamine (METH) use and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are highly comorbid, and both are associated with increased prevalence of affective distress. Delineating the trajectory of affective distress in the context of METH dependence and HIV infection is important given the implications for everyday functional impairment, adverse health behaviors, and increased risk for adverse health outcomes. Methods: We conducted a five-year longitudinal investigation involving 133 METH-dependent (74 HIV seropositive) and 163 non-METH-dependent (90 HIV seropositive) persons to examine both long-standing patterns and transient changes in affective distress. Mixed-effect regression models with random subject-specific slopes and intercepts evaluated the effect of METH dependence, HIV serostatus, and related variables on affective distress, as measured by the Profile of Mood States. Results: Transient changes in affective distress were found to be greater among those with a diagnosis of current MDD, briefer durations of abstinence from METH, and higher quantity of METH consumed. Weak associations were observed among static (time-independent predictors) covariates and long-standing patterns in affective distress. Limitations: Study lacked data pertaining to the participantsí involvement in METH treatment and relied on respondent-driven sampling. Conclusions: Our longitudinal investigation of the trajectory of affective distress indicated that specific and dynamic indices of current METH use were associated with greater transient changes in mood. In the evaluation and treatment of affective distress, recency and quantity of current METH use are important to consider given their association with heightened affective distress and mood instability over time.

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